Results 1 - 10 of 38 for stomach cancer
  1. ... increases the chance of developing a form of stomach(gastric) cancer. In this form, known as diffuse gastric cancer, ... to form a tumor but will invade the stomach wall and metastasize as small clusters of cancer cells into nearby tissues.These CDH1 gene mutations ...
  2. ... a 56 to 70 percent chance of developing stomach (gastric) cancer in their lifetimes. Women with these mutations also ... the likelihood that cancer cells will invade the stomach wall and small clusters of cancer cells will metastasize into nearby tissues. In combination, ...
  3. ... called melanoma, a liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma, stomach (gastric) cancer, and pancreatic cancer. The FAT4 gene mutations involved ...
  4. ... cells called non-Hodgkin lymphoma and less frequently, stomach (gastric) cancer.People with CVID may start experiencing signs and ...
  5. ... in the development of a small percentage of stomach (gastric) cancers. adenomatous polyposis coli APC_HUMAN DP2 DP2.5 ...
  6. ... is abnormally active (overexpressed) in certain types of stomach (gastric) cancers, and this amplification is associated with a poor ...
  7. ... hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract (particularly the stomach and intestines) and a greatly increased risk of developing certain types of cancer.Children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome often develop small, ...
  8. ... shown that AMER1 gene changes are associated with stomach (gastric), breast, and colorectal cancers. It is likely that these gene changes impair ...
  9. ... cancer of the ovary, breast, lung, brain, and stomach. These mutations are also involved in cancer of the colon (large intestine) and rectum, which ...
  10. ... Lynch syndrome also have an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, small intestine, liver, gallbladder ducts, urinary tract, brain, and skin. Additionally, women with this disorder have a high risk of cancer of the ovaries and lining of the uterus ( ...
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