Results 1 - 10 of 36 for lactation drugs
  1. Breastfeeding (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... because they have certain illnesses. Some medicines, illegal drugs, and alcohol can also ... contact a lactation consultant. NIH: National Institute of ...
  2. Infant and Newborn Nutrition (National Library of Medicine)  
    Food provides the energy and nutrients that babies need to be healthy. For a baby, breast milk is best. It has all the necessary vitamins and minerals. Infant ...
  3. COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) (National Library of Medicine)  
    COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is an illness caused by a virus. This virus is a new coronavirus that has spread throughout the world. It is thought to ...
  4. Pregnancy and Opioids (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... taking. Check with your health care provider before breastfeeding. There are some women who should not breastfeed, such as those who have HIV or take illegal drugs. What are the treatments for opioid use disorders ...
  5. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... section to lower the risk during childbirth. During breastfeeding How can I prevent giving HIV to my baby? You can greatly lower that risk by taking HIV/AIDS medicines. These medicines will also help protect your health. ...
  6. Botox (National Library of Medicine)  
    Botox is a drug made from a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It's the same toxin that causes a life-threatening type of food poisoning ...
  7. Breast Cancer (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... enough exercisee Limiting your exposure to estrogen by Breastfeeding your babies if you can Limiting hormone therapy If you are at high risk, your health care provider may suggest that you take certain medicines to lower the risk. Some women at very ...
  8. Twins, Triplets, Multiple Births (National Library of Medicine)  
    If you are pregnant with more than one baby, you are far from alone. Multiple births are up in the United States. More women are having babies after age ...
  9. HIV/AIDS (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... most common way that it spreads. By sharing drug needles Through contact with the blood of a person with HIV From mother to baby during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding Who is at risk for HIV infection? Anyone ...
  10. HIV: PrEP and PEP (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... try to get pregnant, during pregnancy, or while breastfeeding. How well does PrEP work? PrEP is very effective when you take it every day. It reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. In people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk of HIV by more ...
previous · 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · next