Results 1 - 10 of 32 for burn
  1. The depth of a burn determines its severity. First degree burns damage the outer layer of skin (epidermis) and cause pain, redness and swelling (erythema). ...
  2. To treat a minor burn, run cool water over the area of the burn or soak it in a cool water bath (not ice water). ... flushing or soaking for several minutes, cover the burn with a sterile bandage or a clean cloth. ...
  3. Mild, or first degree burns cause only reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), as seen in this photograph. Second degree burns cause ...
  4. First degree burns produce only reddening of the skin. Second degree burns produce blistering, as seen here.
  5. Burns to the airway can be caused by inhaling smoke, steam, superheated air, or toxic fumes, often in a poorly ventilated space. Airway burns can be very serious since the rapid swelling ...
  6. First degree burns affect the outer layer of the skin, causing pain, redness, and swelling.
  7. Second-degree burns affect both the outer and underlying layer of the skin, causing pain, redness, swelling, and blistering.
  8. Third-degree burns extend into deeper tissues, causing brown or blackened skin that may be numb.
  9. ... other conditions that impair mobility. Falls, fainting, and burns are the main threats to bathroom safety. ... other conditions that impair mobility. Falls, fainting, and burns are the main threats to bathroom safety.
  10. ... emotional or physical stress Tissue damage (for example, burns) A high hematocrit may indicate: Dehydration Burns Diarrhea Eclampsia Erythrocytosis Polycythemia vera Shock
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