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Results 1 - 10 of 52 for poison ivy OR "dermatitis," contact allergic
  1. ... of contact dermatitis: irritant or allergic. See also: Poison ivy - oak - sumac
  2. Poison Ivy (Children's Hospital Boston)  
    ... higher risk. What causes an allergic reaction to poison ivy? Most people (85%) who come in contact with it will have an allergic reaction, but it’s actually the oil from the ...
  3. ... The Basics) Patient information: Diaper rash (The Basics) Poison ivy (Toxicodendron) dermatitis Related Searches Allergic contact dermatitis Contact dermatitis Dermatitis Dyshidrotic dermatitis Irritant contact ...
  4. ... determine a cause. Limited areas may indicate a poison ivy rash or other allergic contact dermatitis, while widespread rashes covering the entire body ...
  5. ... areas of involvement may indicate shingles (zoster), a poison ivy rash or other allergic and irritant contact dermatides, while widespread distribution is typical of drug ...
  6. Treating Eczema with Steroids (American Academy of Dermatology)  
    ... to treat widespread acute eczema, such as severe allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy. Systemic corticosteroids include: methylprednisolone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, and ...
  7. Skin Rashes and Other Changes (American Academy of Family Physicians)  
    ... and are blisters forming? Yes This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION. Wash the area with soap and water ...
  8. Contact Dermatitis: Tips for Getting Rid of the Rash (American Academy of Dermatology)  
    ... poison oak, or poison sumac without knowing it. Poison ivy is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The following tips can help: Poison ivy: ...
  9. ... ivy. Antihistamines taken by mouth are effective for allergic reactions or itchy rashes — from contact with poison ivy to mosquito bites to bee and wasp stings. ...
  10. Poison Ivy Dermatitis (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)  
    ... turn shades of red and purple in fall. Poison ivy is caused by an allergic reaction ( allergic contact dermatitis ) to the oily coating that covers of ... person doesn't have to come in direct contact with the leaves, roots, or ... some time and remain allergic. A sensitivity can change at any time. There's ...
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