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So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start.

You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest.

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Photograph of a woman looking at an at-home pregnancy test
Results 1 - 10 of 5,172 for pregnancy
  1. Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care ...
  2. Pregnancy and Substance Abuse (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... unborn baby. First, don't smoke. Smoking during pregnancy passes nicotine and cancer-causing drugs to your ...
  3. Ectopic Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... woman is pregnant. If you have an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in an abnormal place, ... tubes. The result is usually a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy can be a medical emergency if it ruptures. ...
  4. Health Problems in Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    Every pregnancy has some risk of problems. The causes can be conditions you already have or conditions you develop. ... pregnant with more than one baby, previous problem pregnancies, or being over age 35. They can affect ...
  5. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some ...
  6. Teenage Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... plan to get pregnant, but many do. Teen pregnancies carry extra health risks to both the mother ... later on. They have a higher risk for pregnancy-related high blood pressure and its complications. Risks ...
  7. Tumors and Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...
  8. Diabetes and Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... monitor and control your blood sugar levels during pregnancy. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test ...
  9. Infections and Pregnancy (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... Only some medicines and vaccines are safe during pregnancy. Ask your health care provider about how best ...
  10. Pregnancy and Medicines (National Library of Medicine)  
    ... become pregnant through the first part of your pregnancy. Folic acid helps to prevent birth defects of ...
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